Business week, making millions “blogging”

http://www.businessweek.com/smallbiz/content/jul2007/sb20070713_202390.htm

The article talks about “bloggers” making millions online.     Funny part is few of these people actually qualify as “bloggers”.   Shoemoney somehow made the list,  even though only 3% of his income comes from his blog.    Others mentioned like Techcrunch,  boingboing, talkingpointsmemo, perezhilton etc aren’t blogs,   they are media properties with lots of employees.  

I see no difference in the number of employees, style of writing how the site is layed out etc between those sites and sites like drudgereport,  collegehumor, fark  and ebaumsworld.com      The only difference is if you were in business pre 2004  you are a media company,  if you were founded after you are a “blog”.

Techcrunch has 21 employees today,   when it started it had one guy writing and posting on new companies.  I think techcrunch was a blog when it started but it definitely isn’t today.  The day you incorporate is the day your site stops being a “Blog” and becomes a Media Company. 

14 Responses to “Business week, making millions “blogging””

  1. Clark Says:

    I agree.
    A blog is a personal site with a guy writing that is it.
    All those companies/sites listed are sites that are big, ran out of an office.

  2. Saïd Amin Says:

    “The day you incorporate is the day your site stops being a “Blog” and becomes a Media Company. ”

    Huh? Silly. We call it a “blog” (aka a fancy web 2.0 word) for practical reasons so as to give context and definition to what it is. Likewise with labels like “social networks”, “dating sites”, etc. Who cares if it is for profit, a hobby by one or more guys/gals or incorporated. TechCrunch is a “blog”, Plenty of Fish is a “dating” site and both are online businesses.

    Word.

    -S

  3. Wallyworld (a.k.a. Les Miserable) Says:

    Exactly. It really gets up my nose the way the newspapers now have what they call “blogs” – when in reality they are just columns. I do occasional (unpaid) pieces for The Sydney Morning Herald blog “Radar” (not even going to bother linking to it). I started doing them two or three years ago when they only had a couple of “blogs”. But now they have umpteen-dozen. The front page proudly announces “All our blogs”. And they are written by full-time journalists. Thing is, what we were blogging about two years ago was often ahead of what they’d have in the front section. Dumb bastards still just pull stuff off the wire – Reuters, AAP – give it a snappy headline and re-run it in its entirety – “The Dumbing Down of the Media”.

  4. Mitch Brisebois Says:

    further to your point, TechCrunch announces today that it has acquired InviteShare. Blogs don’t “acquire” other companies!

    http://www.techcrunch.com/2007/07/19/techcrunch-acquires-inviteshare/

  5. Marc Says:

    I agree with you for the most part. I think they still call them blogs because of the chronological thread of stories. However, I think you’re right in pointing out a good number of the bloggers didn’t make their money blogging as that slideshow would have the uninitiated believe. Agood number of them leveraged existing traffic and reputation to their blogs which are more of a sideline business.

    I think they should have dug deeper to find more of the ones who do blogging exclusively at home in underwear with no life and big bucks… lol

  6. When Is A Blog No Longer A Blog? | John Chow dot Com Says:

    [...] fame is asking if some of those blogs listed by Business Week should even be call blogs. In his recent blog post, Markus contends: The article talks about “bloggers” making millions online. Funny part is few [...]

  7. Alex Ion Says:

    I do agree that just a few qualify as bloggers but if you ask me TechCrunch even if it has 21 employees it’s still a blog, and not just for the chronological thread of stories. It allows people to comment and that is what a blogger is about : interacting with its readers.

    I agree however with Shoemoney and the others :)

  8. Markus Says:

    Every major media company now has “blogs” does that mean all media companies are now blogging companies?

  9. geekfeeder.net » Blog Archive » When Is A Blog No Longer A Blog? Says:

    [...] fame is asking if some of those blogs listed by Business Week should even be call blogs. In his recent blog post, Markus contends: The article talks about “bloggers” making millions online. Funny part is few [...]

  10. SensoryMetrics: re-inventing the User eXperience » Hot Media Properties: The evolution of successful blogs Says:

    [...] founder Markus Frind had a good post about how successful blogs don’t start making lots of money.  They evolve into media [...]

  11. ladysman Says:

    Да уж, прочитал статью, автор, а Вы где взяли эти выводы и цитаты? Если это Ваше мнение, то Вы просто гений.

  12. Andre Says:

    To each his own, and everyone has his own approach and ingenuity to make money online

  13. Shawn Says:

    It is not unusual for large blogging company to have 30-40 employees

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