Cited in the Fields Medal/Nobel prize in math

Several years ago I came up with a algorithm that was thousands of times faster then anything else known at finding long chains of primes in sequences.   primes.plentyoffish.com contains the original post I made when we found the first 23 primes in succession.   I created the application, and then recruited Paul Jobling  and Paul Underwood to provide computers to aid in finding the record.

In 2004 Terry Tao solved one of the hardest problems in Math and cited our record http://arxiv.org/pdf/math.NT/0404188

Here is more details on why he won the Fields Medal which is considered the Nobel Prize of Math, there is a typo there as it should say the record is 23 primes in progression.  Paul Jobling emailed Terry Tao to confirm.

http://www.physorg.com/news75479793.html

Earlier this year I refined the program and found several more chains of 23 primes.  I am amazed I managed to create this program in the first place,  I barely barely even understand how it works and I wrote it.  This is because the program scans in multiple dimensions is very hard to conceptualize.  At any rate I think its cool that my record is cited in the Fields Medals press release.

18 Responses to “Cited in the Fields Medal/Nobel prize in math”

  1. Carson Says:

    Unreal – so the truth finally comes out, turn out you’re a closet genius.

  2. Mathew Ingram Says:

    Congratulations, Markus. How many guys whose research is cited in a Fields Medal paper do you think run online dating sites? I’m betting not many 🙂

  3. John Webster Says:

    That’s amazing. Congratulations!

    Really enjoy reading your blog, keep up the interesting posts.

  4. A Says:

    Very Cool. Congratulations.

  5. michael webster Says:

    I read your explanation of your algo, but is there a simple example, say one with only 3 diminsions which explains your alternative approach?

  6. Nick Pang Says:

    nobel prize next? congrats!

  7. Want to date a math genius? » Mathew Ingram: mathewingram.com/work Says:

    […] Markus recently posted a description of how he came up with an algorithm that isolated 23 prime numbers in succession for the first time, and how that research was in turn cited by Terence Tao in a paper he did on prime numbers, a paper that helped contribute to him winning the Fields Medal. […]

  8. /pd Says:

    that’s so kewl..

    Now can you program /alog on how to get 23 consecutive date’s thru plentyoffish.com..please please… !! :)- Just kidding !!

    Cong’rats on the algos and citation

  9. Nick Says:

    Congratulations and………
    respect!🙂

  10. Black Says:

    Congratulations Markus,

    I became obsessed with proving Fermat’s Last Theorem a few years back (given up – for now) so I can imagine this is a very satisfying result for you.

    Regards

  11. Chris Risenhoover Says:

    I am a closet math geek – my undergrad was in mathematics. Great math can be beautiful, much like art. Great work on tapping your ‘math genius’ and writting the program in the first place.

  12. Money Making Forum Says:

    Fantastic news Markus, well done on the mention.

  13. Markus Frind, 21st-century superhero » Mathew Ingram: mathewingram.com/work Says:

    […] Digg it   |   Track with co.mments   |     |   Cosmos   |   Annotate this page Click here for copyright permissions! Copyright 2006 MathewIngram […]

  14. No Name Says:

    Fantastic news Markus, well done on the mention.

  15. Tom lee Says:

    Well done Markus, great news, congratulation :-)!

  16. The 10,000-Hour Challenge — Turning Pro Says:

    […] that view would be seriously held, but in a discussion we had recently, about a guy who uncovered AP23 “for fun,” people were still pulling the luck […]

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  18. math help for kids Says:

    math help for kids…

    […]Cited in the Fields Medal/Nobel prize in math « Plenty of fish blog[…]…

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