BBC Mention.

Got a nice little mention on the BBC at the start of the month.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qhVPQZXPG3o    Its at about the 6 minute Mark.

Its hard to allow troops to access the site from around the world  as the same IP addresses are used by scammers.    Hitwise is now reporting that plentyoffish is the Market Leader in the UK.    I can say that the UK is by far the hardest market to support.   The scamming problem is 10 times worse than in the USA  as it seems scammers are actually based in the UK and actively working with other scammers around the world.   The worst part of the UK is that  everyone shares IP addresses  which makes things a lot more complicated.

13 Responses to “BBC Mention.”

  1. idont Says:

    We face exactly the same situation:

    SCAM from the UK is a major issue as scammers coordinate with guys from Eastern countries, Africa, …

    As these countries do not do anything to fight scam we have simply banned full ranges of ISPs from these countries…😦

    Sad…

  2. Mayo Says:

    Can you mention some examples of scammers? What is the worst problem. I would love to hear your experiences of handling that kind of situation.

  3. Matthew Says:

    Would a mac address filter work? All those are unique🙂

  4. Aris Says:

    It might help if you had some sort of e-mail verification of new accounts. I recently got added as a POF user because someone use my e-mail address. Shouldn’t you require e-mail verification of new accounts?

  5. idont Says:

    MAC address? It is not on the same layer…😦

    Problem of SCAM: it is an industry in some areas. You have teams of guys doing it 24/7/365.

    Issues:
    – dynamic IPs
    – Proxies
    – ISP hidding their clients IPs

    The scamers have enough knowledge, mobility and contacts to use weakpoints worldwide.

    Email verification: useless against the professional. You can create thousands of new “verified” emails per day if needed.

  6. Ben Says:

    “The worst part of the UK is that everyone shares IP addresses”

    Er, thats quite a statement- Care to explain it? Most ADSL netorks as I understand it give you a an IP (may not be static), Dialups assign one not fixed, corporate users of your site are probably all coming from 1 ip when at work and then theres AOL. But i don’t see anything particularily specific to the UK there?

  7. Markus Says:

    in north america IP is mapped to a single user most of the time. In the uk multipul people use the Same IP’s the majority of the time.

  8. Mayo Says:

    in europe we have mostly dynamic ip’s unless you have ftth fiber links

  9. Massimo Moruzzi Says:

    Markus,

    I think you should ask people their mobile phone number, send them a verification code via SMS (VoIP sms if possible to keep costs low) and ban forever every phone number which is associated with fraudolent behaviour.

  10. David J. Says:

    One of the easiest methods of verification (and minimizing scammers) is a simple phone call. With the advent of VoIP it’s becoming less ‘surefire’, but it’s a great way of at least getting rid of the hobby-scammers.

    I’d highly recommend partaking in it, it isn’t all that expensive these days to call anywhere in the world — it’s a worthy investment to reduce your scum.

  11. CPCcurmudgeon Says:

    One can’t cordon off large areas of the Internet and continue to grow, can
    one? There is only but so much ad revenue available in the “trusted” part
    of the Internet.

    As for the claim about most North Americans being on a single IP, even if
    that is true, it doesn’t mean they can’t make fraudulent accesses from
    those. After all, there is a lot of malware, etc. floating around these
    days, and botnets proliferate.

  12. No Name Says:

    in north america IP is mapped to a single user most of the time. In the uk multipul people use the Same IP’s the majority of the time

  13. Bon Says:

    Marcus. You clearly talk shit. Perhaps you were trying to think up ways to target this particular country with SEO!

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